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Teat Dips

The teats of the dairy cow play an important part in quality milk production. The skin of a damaged teat may harbour many different bacteria responsible for causing mastitis. The principal organisms associated with mastitis are Streptococcus agalactiae, Streptococcus uberis, and Micrococcus pyogene.  

A healthy teat end will help prevent bacteria responsible for causing mastitis from gaining entry into the udder. These organisms usually cause a chronic mastitis and a loss in milk yield with or without the appearance of clinical symptoms. To prevent mastitis, farmers must provide optimal milking procedures applied with the most hygienic method to minimize pathogens invading udders.

The degree of exposure to infection, natural resistance of individuals, age, stage of lactation, and prolonged milking duration influence the rate of udder infections. Abusive machine milking, especially prolonged milking and use of worn or poorly designed teat cup liners, tends to increase the rate of clinical mastitis in infected quarters.

Milk from infected quarters contains bacteria that may contaminate the skin of many other teats during milking. Staph aureus or Strep agalactiae in milk from an infected cow may be found on the teatcup liners and transferred to the teat skin of the next 5-6 cows that are milked with that unit. They multiply (especially at sites of teat lesions) and so increase the risk of infection of the quarter via the teat canal. Teat disinfection helps keep teat skin healthy and heal skin lesions, and these actions may be its most important contribution to mastitis control.

The teats of the dairy cow play an important part in quality milk production. The skin of a damaged teat may harbour many different bacteria responsible for causing mastitis. The principal organisms a... read more
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