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Antifoams

Fermentation Process Antifoams

Foaming during fermentation is viewed as a nuisance because of the need to aerate the broth while keeping the foam under control, frequently viewed as a “black art”. Foams in fermentations are likely derived from a variety of excreted products or cell lysis products and not solely from extracellular proteins.  

Foam stabilisation at the beginning of the fermentation resultsfrom  proteins already present in the growing medium, whereas at the end of the fermentation, by proteins produced by the microorganisms.

Conditions that affect the degree of foaming during fermentation include gas introduction (i.e. aeration), medium composition, cell growth, metabolic formation, surface active substance formation, and indirectly, vessel geometry.

The formation of foam differs depending on whether early or late phase.   Foaming later in the fermentation process has been found easier to control using antifoams, there being five distinct patterns of foam behaviour during fermentation.

Many aspects of the initial medium composition affect foam formation, including concentrations of salts, proteins sugars as well as the presence of alcohols.  Short chain alcohols (methanol, ethanol and propanol) increase foaminess of protein/water solutions.

Because no single antifoam has all the properties for all foam control situations Biocel have designed a portfolio of  antifoams/ foam inhibitors and defoamers/foam breakers to meet your specific application.

Ask us about fermentation foam control.

 

 

Fermentation Process Antifoams Foaming during fermentation is viewed as a nuisance because of the need to aerate the broth while keeping the foam under control, frequently viewed as a “black ... read more
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